Missionaries in Honduras create job opportunities for struggling parents

Missionaries in Honduras create job opportunities for struggling parents

You’re a parent of two children in Honduras, struggling to provide for your family in a violent and poverty-stricken neighborhood. The loving education your kids receive at the local Christian school is a rare blessing. The school charges a small tuition fee, but it is a manageable cost. Then you hear news of a deadly virus circulating the world. Before you know it, your community has shut down to prevent the spread of the virus. You’ve lost your job, and soon you aren’t able to feed your kids, much less pay tuition.

Such is a scenario many families in Flor del Campo, Honduras experienced when the 2020 pandemic hit. SAMS missionaries Suzy McCall, Amanda Scott, and Stephen and Debra Buckner serve there at the LAMB Institute. LAMB is an extensive ministry with a children’s home and church, a school, and other programs to help at-risk children and youth. Students depend on that community in a place plagued by danger and destitution. The ministry infuses hope into children through Christ-centered education and spiritual nourishment. The pandemic would have threatened kids’ ability to participate. Yet LAMB, led by Suzy, knew they needed a way to keep kids in school while also empowering families to pay tuition with dignity. The solution they created gives parents a chance to work off the payments owed. That is not all – the plan also equips families with start-up small businesses and skills they can use after they have paid off tuition debt.

Suzy describes the project – “We have created jobs for family members of the students who owe money. First, we hired a coordinator for this project, which will initially run for three months. We have selected a young woman in our neighborhood who holds a university degree and is currently unemployed. Several small businesses have already started: a man is selling fresh fruits and vegetables from a cart which he pushes around the neighborhood; another family is selling paper products; another is selling plastic products. A carpenter in our youth outreach program offered to train a small group of people in woodworking, with the hope that they would eventually produce marketable goods, such as furniture. They have completed their first project: three bookcases. Our fund underwrites the start-up expenses, pays the carpenter, and provides stipends for the ‘employees.’ Again, we will underwrite the materials and pay the workers for the first three months, with the stipulation that part of their pay will be applied towards their school debt. If some of the businesses are successful in generating profit, we can turn them over to the operators, and they can continue without our help.” Empowered by God’s grace, this ministry puts legs on our Lord’s calling to proclaim good news to the poor (Isaiah 61:1). Lift up these Honduran families in prayer as they engage in these small business opportunities and interact with the Christian community at LAMB.

In 2021, SAMS World Relief Fund (WRF) provided for a grant of $4,000 for LAMB’s job creation project. SAMS WRF has helped other ministries in Honduras as well. Two severe hurricanes devastated other areas of Honduras in Fall 2020. Stay tuned to read how SAMS Missionaries are helping those communities get back on their feet.

Senders giving generously to SAMS World Relief Fund in 2020 and 2021 have enabled missionaries globally to help their communities in dire circumstances caused by the pandemic and natural disasters. In four rounds of grants, SAMS WRF has given to 18 missionary projects and five diocesan projects, totalling $80,700 since April 2020.

Growing Grace in San Lorenzo

Growing Grace in San Lorenzo

A Honduran reporter once said that San Lorenzo was a village forgotten by man and God. Yet God had not forgotten. He used this report to inspire a Honduran priest to reach out to this isolated mountain community of subsistence farmers.  Missionary Jeannie Loving went along and began to serve the people in the name of Christ in 2008.  A church formed. Jeannie began to dream that this spiritual community would have its own building.

God opened the door for other projects first. Jeannie coordinated construction of a playground and a community center made of ram-packed earth. Several groups began to use this center, including a kindergarten and the new church. Eventually, Jeannie fixed up a simple house so she could be rooted in the lives of the people.

Hunger arising from crop failure is a regular occurrence in San Lorenzo. The villagers raise crops for their families’ daily food, usually without surplus to sell. Jeannie was eager to help them farm successfully. She applied her experience as an organic gardener to train farmers. Jeannie started a demonstration farm where she shows how to develop rich soil through composting. People receive seeds and seedlings.

Jeannie saw the community’s hunger for God, too. She organized Bible studies with the help of fellow Christians gifted in teaching. People have attended those studies enthusiastically. Jeannie says that “their greatest spiritual need is one we all have: to forgive. It is by forgiving that you are forgiven. We need a lot of forgiveness.”

When the Diocese of Honduras approved construction of the church building, Jeannie’s decade-old dream began to be realized. SAMS Missionary and Architect Jack Melvin designed the building with input from the community.  Jack shares that Edil, a member of the church and the chief contractor, “is a true craftsman, who puts love into his work.” Construction proceeded quickly in spite of a pause due to the pandemic – and with no electric tools! The priest, Father Victor, who serves three churches, preaches and leads Holy Eucharist every two weeks. Jeannie says “He is very pastoral. He sends all the vestry members daily encouragement, stories, and Bible passages.” Iglesia Santa Maria Magdalena now has its own space in which they can serve the community, thanks to generous Senders who caught the vision God planted in Jeannie’s heart.

Update: Gospel-Centered Apprenticeship Provides New Maternity Center for Ugandan Community in the Midst of Pandemic

Update: Gospel-Centered Apprenticeship Provides New Maternity Center for Ugandan Community in the Midst of Pandemic

In February, we reported on the work of Missionary Bridger Patrick Lutalo, founder of the Christian apprenticeship program Teach Men to Fish in Uganda. In the midst of the pandemic, Patrick’s team of young disciples has been able to complete the new maternity center in Mityana, Uganda. This facility, built by a group of young adults equipped spiritually and practically in Christ, will be a blessing to the overall health and wellness of mothers and children in the community. See updated pictures below.

SAMS World Relief Fund (WRF) provided a grant towards this project completion.  Would you help support practical, incarnational ministry in Christ with a gift to SAMS WRF? We thank God for the generosity of Senders equipping Missionaries to provide relief in this increasingly tragic time for our world. In this case, SAMS WRF also helped provide funds for development through local Ugandan youth. We praise God for Patrick’s enthusiasm to mentor these young adults in Christ.