Our Traditional Wedding Ceremony

I’ve visited the homestead of my wife’s father before, but this time it was official. In Dholuo culture, marrying a daughter of the boma is finalized through an official gathering at the father’s home, where relatives host a wedding feast and receive gifts and bride price from the groom. My first delegation traveled to Alego Kaluo in 2009. However, the husband of a younger daughter may not officially visit the father’s home until his elder brother (the husband of the first daughter) has first presented himself. So after, 5 years of marriage, I finally had the privilege of traveling to Kaluo to solmenize our marriage through traditional wedding.
 Dave accompanied by his two representatives: Rev. Francis and Rev. Peter.
 
Uncles of Lucy share a hearty meal of brown Ugali (millet), roasted goat, and traditional chicken during the wedding celebrations.

Aunties present a gift to their special visitors.
This is the house where we planned to stay (on a new ministry property in Siaya), but due to heavy rains we quickly made other arrangements.
Josh and Paul prefer the Mwalimu Guesthouse in Siaya.

Inspiring Hope Group Launch

Earlier this month we held the official launch for Inspiring Hope Group (IHG), a fellowship, savings, and business development group for youth in Kenya.

Nearly one hundred parents, friends, and partners joined us for the event at ACK Christ Church in Westlands.

IHG currently has 22 members and runs two businesses: iHope Farms and iHope Photography (www.iHopephoto.com).

 Words of encouragement from local clergy during the IHG Launch.
Group members during a meeting at the Chaves family’s flat.
Our Farm Manager, Benjamin inspects onion seedlings being prepared for transplantation at the project site in Bungoma, western Kenya.

Graduation Day

Congratulations to Lucy!

Graduating from St. Paul’s University Divinity School with first class honours. Photos from the campus and ceremony in Limuru, Kenya:

Occultism, Spirit Possession and Hysteria

During a recent visit to Western Kenya, I accompanied a friend for an emergency pastoral visit to a local primary school. Students, teachers and parents gathered at the rural school along with the local Chief, Councilor, District Medial Officer, Police Commander and four military personnel. 

All of these had come in response to school hysteria and multiple cases of “spirit possession.” Also present were religious leaders from a local cult who over a period of several days used a variety of rituals to try to “appease the evil spirits.” The spirits were apparently annoyed because a promised human sacrifice was never delivered. In a case that garnered national media attention, learning was paralyzed in the school for weeks.

Here’s an interview with one of the teachers along with a few clips I shot:

After the cult leaders were encouraged to leave, 6 girls received deliverance through prayer.

Diocesan Youth Pastor, Peter Omondi addresses distressed parents.

Local government leaders look on.
 Prayers following deliverance session.